Sporty BMW i3s, electric Mini, diesel jail sentence, tougher emission testing: The Week in Reverse

Which huge company challenged the public to “read the documents,” only to get bitten when two researchers did exactly that?

What new and updated electric cars will appear at the Frankfurt auto show?

This is our look back at the Week In Reverse—right here at Green Car Reports—for the week ending on Friday, September 1, 2017.

Friday, tough new test standards for European new cars went into effect, which should produce much more realistic emission and fuel-economy ratings.

We noted that an old and traditional name in diesel truck engines, Cummins, released an electric semi tractor concept that stole a march on Tesla, which will reveal its own upcoming semi truck this month.

On Thursday, we turned our attention to the Frankfurt auto show that is nearly upon us, and the green car concepts and production models set to debut.

California will receive a large sum of money from the Volkswagen Environmental Mitigation Trust following its diesel emission scandal—and the Diesel Technology Forum has ideas on what the money should be used for.

Wednesday, BMW revealed renderings of the Mini Electric Concept that will debut in two weeks at the Frankfurt show.

How high are sales of plug-in electric cars in China? From January through June, they were twice as high as battery-electric and plug-in hybrid sales in the U.S.

On Tuesday, we learned demand for used diesel cars is dropping in Germany, as buyers hold back out of fear that software updates to make them cleaner will hurt performance, fuel efficiency, and value.

Another Frankfurt debut will be a new i3s sport model of the updated 2018 BMW i3 electric car; we had all the details.

We kicked off the week on Monday by noting that Nissan has agreed to complete the sale of its AESC electric-car battery unit to a Chinese private-equity firm.

An Audi engineer in Germany has now implicated top executives in VW Group’s sprawling diesel emission cheating scandal.

Separately, the sentence handed down to a VW diesel engineer was stiffer than expected, including 40 months in jail.

And we explained why should you talk about hot dogs and buns in discussing electric cars and public charging stations. Trust us; you should read it.

Chevrolet Bolt EV being charged outside Go Forth electric-car showroom, Portland [photo: Forth]

Chevrolet Bolt EV being charged outside Go Forth electric-car showroom, Portland [photo: Forth]

Enlarge Photo

Challenging the public to “read the documents” can have unexpected consequences: Exxon lied to the public for three decades about climate change, a peer-reviewed study found.

Finally, now that the EPA has reopened its Midterm Review of finalized emission limits for 2022-2025 vehicles, we explained how you can submit comments to the agency on those rules.

Those were our main stories this week; we’ll see you again next week. Until then, this has been the Green Car Reports Week in Reverse update.

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