Ghosn on EVs, Honda Clarity PHEV driven, California emissions standards, GM talks CAFE changes, and Japanese solid-state batteries: Today's Car News

2018 Honda Clarity PHEV Plugged into L1 in Corte Madera, Calif.

2018 Honda Clarity PHEV Plugged into L1 in Corte Madera, Calif.

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Carlos Ghosn, a leading proponent for electric cars at the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance, believes the industry has found the electric-range sweet spot. It’s the price that must drop to sway consumers. Green Car Reports takes another look at the 2018 Honda Clarity PHEV to see if a new perspective brings different results. Major Japanese automakers have joined forces to develop next-generation solid-state batteries. General Motors weighs in on looming CAFE changes. And the results are in after asking readers if California should be allowed to set its own emission and fuel-economy regulations. All this and more on Green Car Reports.

Ghosn, who helped bring the first-generation Nissan Leaf to market, believes 188 miles of range is more than enough for drivers. But, the cost of electric cars must come down, the executive said. Government incentives remain a driving force for electric-car buyers.

GCR takes another look at the Honda Clarity PHEV with a fresh perspective. In the process, we draw parallels between the Clarity’s technology and budding engineering science at the 1997 FutureCar program. Is the Clarity PHEV the vehicle former President Bill Clinton wanted?

Amid increased competition from American scientists, Japanese automakers banded together to develop solid-state lithium-ion batteries for electric cars. Specifically, Toyota, Nissan, and Honda have joined forces with battery makers Panasonic and GS Yuasa, along with the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry. The group has $14 million at its disposal for the potentially game-changing batteries.

GM CEO Mary Barra spoke out as the Trump administration looks to revise Obama-era Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards. Barra said GM is in favor of a single national standard and urged the federal government and the state of California to reach a compromise.

Finally, we have results from our latest Twitter poll. We asked readers if California should be allowed to set its own emission and fuel-economy standards. The final tally shouldn’t come as a shock.

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